Final Project – Hexagons

Hexagons 2
Cubic pyrite crystal
Hexagons 3
Socket
IMG_6810
Dish scrubber
Hexagons 1
Colored pencils
IMG_6743
Dead end sign
Hexagons 4
Quartz
Hexagons 5
Black mica

Landscape Photos from Three Generations of Phones

For this assignment, I thought it would be interesting to show a sampling of camera capabilities across three successive generations of phones that I have owned. Differences in resolution, dynamic range, and sensor quality can be seen.

Snowy Mountains on the Tubal Cain Trail in the Olympic Mountains

Motorola Droid RAZR, 2014-03-30, 2048×1536, f/2.4, 1/2857s, 4.60mm, ISO 100

Salt Creek Recreation Area, Overcast, Looking South from a Rocky Spit

LG V10, 2016-01-07, 5312×2988, f/1.8, 1/120s, 4.42mm, ISO 50, auto-HDR composite

Looking West During a Hot May Day from the Newcastle Golf Course

LG G6, 2017-05-13, 3120×4160, f/2.4, 1/2483s, 2.01mm, ISO 50, wide angle camera

Presidential Portrait Photography of Shealah Craighead

The new Chief Official White House Photographer for the Trump Administration is Shealah Craighead, and while I’m not sure what to think of her photography just yet, I believe her photography may prove influential in the future. Recently, there was a new presidential portrait taken by Craighead which used some questionable lighting and composition choices.

POTUS and VPOTUS Official Portrait

Shealah Craighead took the photo on the left, while a different photographer took Pence’s portrait on the right. Looking closely at the photos reveals the direction of lighting, with low lighting with Trump’s portrait and more direct and above lighting with Pence’s. The picture frame in Trump’s portrait distracts, as well as the deeper depth of field drawing the eye to the wallpaper and wrinkles in the flag. In contrast, Pence’s portrait has fewer distractions and a narrower depth of field. I speculate that Shealah is not responsible for many of the composition choices and has her creative freedom overridden by Trump.

Besides her nascent work as Trump’s chief photographer, Craighead worked as the main photographer for Laura Bush and generally during the Bush administration with Dick Cheney’s Photographer.

GWB:  Inauguration Day

Here she is in 2009 with George W. Bush.

Shutter Speed and Aperture Size

For this assignment, I chose to photograph a flowing bathtub faucet to show the change from stopped motion to motion blur and a series of objects on a table to demonstrate how aperture affects the focal plane.

Shutter Speed

IMG_57911/4000 s, ISO 6400, f / 5.6, 55 mm, exp. +1.00IMG_57981/1000 s, ISO 1600, f / 5.6, 55 mm, exp. +1.30IMG_58021/400 s, ISO 800, f / 5.6, 55 mm, exp. +0.90IMG_58221/4 s, ISO 100, f / 20, 55 mm, exp. +0.40

Aperture Size
Objects on a wooden table with tablecloth are, front to back, 3 in 12 ga. shotgun shell, blue ceramic chicken, fossil shark tooth, catfood, Gameboy Color, pumpkin, bananasIMG_5726f /3.5, ISO 400, 1/80 s, 18 mm, exp. -0.30IMG_5735f /9.0, ISO 400, 1/30 s, 18 mm, exp. +1.00IMG_5740f / 16, ISO 400, 1/10 s, 18 mm, exp. +0.90IMG_5744f / 22, ISO 800, 1/8 s, 18 mm, exp. +0.50

Motion Studies: Life in Motion

For this assignment, I chose to photograph my dogs, Campbell and Garth, a truck on the road, and a table lamp.

Stopped Motion
Garth, top, plays with Campbell, bottom. Their mouths and faces are frozen, while motion blur can be seen in Campbell’s right ear.
ISO 6400, 55 mm, f / 5.6, 1/500 s, exp. +0.80IMG_5400

Motion Blur
Garth, left, and Campbell, right.
ISO 100, 55 mm, f / 5.6, 1/8 s, exp. +1.10IMG_5406

Panning with Action
A Chevrolet pickup truck drives outside of Fish Park in Poulsbo.
ISO 100, 75 mm, f / 10, 1/100 s, exp. +0.50IMG_5554

Zoom Blur
A table lamp shines through cooling holes near the switch.
ISO 800, 55 mm, f / 36, 1/10 sIMG_5879

Macro Shots of Metallic Textures

In my composition of these pieces, I chose to select metallic objects and photograph them as closely as possible, then crop to the focused area and crop out any edges, to make the textures flow together. This helps the viewer focus on the actual textures and avoids providing a context. The viewer may not even recognize the object that the textures belong to. For clarity, I have included a description of the subjects in the captions.

These pieces represent two sets of related metallic textures. The first represents brushed metal with secondary aspects such as rust spots or reflections of light. The second represents varied materials with varied machined or natural textures. I chose metal because it comprises a large set of textures with a common color scheme and a structured approach to texture. First, the base material determines color and the range of characteristics. Secondly, the shape of the material determines the way light hits it. Thirdly, there is an applied texture, possibly from brushing, rusting, or metal crystallization.

Brushed textures, from left to right, top to bottom: 1: ‘Modern’ looking rectangular dish for keys, possibly aluminum, with dimples and brushing; 2: Flat side of a rusted and dirty hand saw blade; 3: Stainless steel with brushing and spot rust; 4: Brushed metal cap for a human-sized pyramidal obelisk on the OC campus; 5: Galvanized steel plate with large crystals 6: Tissue box cover, brushed steelFinal Version-1

Varied metallic materials: 1: Copper alloy or bronzed steel decorative pot lid 2: Curved section of the blade near the tip of an M9 bayonet 3: Nickel-iron meteorite sample from Sikhote-Alin 4: Cubic pyrite crystal, single face 5: Gold flake suspended in oil 6: Polished side of a small metal puzzle, possibly plated or dipped steel

Final Version-2